Nature Morte’s “Parallel Postulates”

Elizabeth Prendiville of Saffronart shares a note about the newly opened group exhibition at Nature Morte in New Delhi. 

Mona Rai Krishna-Krishna, 2013 Mixed media on canvas 74" x 72" (188 x 183 cms) diptych http://www.naturemorte.com/exhibitions/2013-12-07_parallel-postulates/

Mona Rai
Krishna-Krishna, 2013
Mixed media on canvas
74″ x 72″ (188 x 183 cms) diptych
http://www.naturemorte.com/exhibitions/2013-12-07_parallel-postulates/

New York:  On December 7th Nature Morte Gallery in New Delhi will be debuting their exhibition “Parallel Postulates” featuring all new work from artists Aakash Nihalani, Anita Dube, Martand Khosla and Mona Rai. All of the works represents an aesthetic focused on geometric patterns and mathematical illustrations. Each artist has an individual approach to utilizing geometric structures in their abstract work.

Martand Khosla System Natural-Iv, 2013 brick dust on paper (silk screen) 31" x 25" (79 x 64 cms) http://www.naturemorte.com/exhibitions/2013-12-07_parallel-postulates/

Martand Khosla
System Natural-Iv, 2013
brick dust on paper (silk screen)
31″ x 25″ (79 x 64 cms) http://www.naturemorte.com/exhibitions/2013-12-07_parallel-postulates/

Although geometric shapes are relatively common themes in abstract-influenced work, “Parallel Postulates” displays a surprisingly diverse range of mediums and approaches. Pieces such as Mona Rai’s “Krishna-Krishna” display mixed media through colors and textures while Martland Khosla’s “System Natural-Iv” uses figural narrative and touches on his experiences with architecture while using the unique medium of brick dust on paper.

Aakash Nihalani  Cloud (Yellow), 2012 Painted Stainless Steel  72" x 72" x .25" (183 x 183 x .64 cms) http://www.naturemorte.com/exhibitions/2013-12-07_parallel-postulates/

Aakash Nihalani Cloud (Yellow), 2012 Painted Stainless Steel 72″ x 72″ x .25″ (183 x 183 x .64 cms) http://www.naturemorte.com/exhibitions/2013-12-07_parallel-postulates/

All four of these artists are New Delhi based except for Aakash Nihalani who currently works in New York. Nature Morte is well known globally for celebrating experimental and conceptual contemporary works as well as promoting cross-cultural dialogue. They refer to the space as both a commercial gallery and a curatorial experiment, thus it should come as no surprise that this exhibition displays a wide variety of mixed media. Nature Morte currently represents Mona Rai and Anita Dube. “Parallel Postulates” will be on display through January 4th 2014. Be sure to visit Nature Morte’s diverse group show while in New Delhi this winter. For more information visit Nature Morte’s website here. 

Raqib Shaw’s ‘Paradise Lost’ at Pace Gallery

Ipshita Sen of Saffronart shares a note on Raqib Shaw’s current exhibition at Pace Gallery.

New York: Raqib Shaw once again makes his mark in the New York public art scene. With his last show in 2008 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, this year Pace Gallery holds a three-venue exhibition of the artist.

Image

Arrival of the Ram King – PARADISE LOST II, 2011-2013. Oil, acrylic, enamel, glitter and rhinestones on Birch wood
http://artdaily.com/news/66103/Monumental-exhibition-spans-all-three-of-Pace-s-25th-Street-galleries-in-Chelsea#.UpFrLGTk9cQ

 The exhibition titled ‘Paradise Lost’ is based on the theme of John Milton’s Paradise Lost. His works are a blend of Indian mythological figures, half man half beast, warring through renaissance inspired landscapes. They are an interesting juxtaposition between Indian miniatures and classical Western architecture. This series of work portrays the triumph of the East over the West –illustrated through the shattered monuments depicted in the works.

His artistic oeuvre is unique and distinctive. Sir Norman Rosenthal says that “Shaw creates truly modern transformations of lost worlds of culture that arise from the exotic gardens of Kashmir to the memories that lie ‘imprisoned’ in the great museums of the Western World.”

Raqib Shaw is born in Calcutta and educated in London. He has had a solo exhibition at the Tate Modern in 2006 and several other group shows.

This exhibition is on until January 11, 2014

Ark Nova: a Collaboration between Anish Kapoor & Arata Isozaki

Elisabetta Marabotto of Saffronart shares a note on Ark Nova, the latest creation of Anish Kapoor and Japanese architect Arata Isozaki

London: On October 14 the world’s first inflatable concert hall was erected in the coastal town of Matsushima, Japan.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki. Image credit: http://www.dezeen.com/2013/09/26/ark-nova-by-arata-isozaki-and-anish-kapoor-completes/

Ark Nova which was modelled on Kapoor’s Leviathan sculptures, will tour across the areas affected by the 2011 earthquake. This mobile structure, a balloon made of coated polyester material, has room for 500 people and it has been designed to stage different kinds of performances ranging from dance and art to orchestras and jazz.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki. Image Credit: http://www.dezeen.com/2013/09/26/ark-nova-by-arata-isozaki-and-anish-kapoor-completes/

Kapoor and Isozaki said about the hall: “We named the Project Ark Nova, or ‘new ark’, with the hope that it will become a symbol of recovery immediately after the great earthquake disaster. Ark Nova obviously can’t carry people and animals to escape from disaster, but we conceived the ark to travel packed with music and various arts, from the perspective of long-term rebuilding of culture and spirit.”

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki. Image Credit: http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2013/09/ark-nova/

The hall was inaugurated by the acclaimed Lucerne Festival of music.

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki

Ark Nova by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki. Image Credit: http://www.dezeen.com/2013/09/26/ark-nova-by-arata-isozaki-and-anish-kapoor-completes/

 

Pomegranate: The Fruit of Paradise

Ipshita Sen of Saffronart explores some of the mysticism attached to the ruby fruit.

New York: The pomegranate is very often associated with the term “ Fruit of Paradise” or “The Fruit of the Underworld”, or more simply, “The Seeded Apple”. Enveloped in mystery and years of folklore, the pomegranate is one of the most admired fruits. Tales of the fruit, whether in Christianity, Judaism or Greek mythology are spread across diverse cultures throughout the world.  Every culture seems to have evolved with a passing reference to the vitality of this rich fruit.

Madonna of the Pomegranate, 1487, Sandro Botticelli. Image Credit: http://www.arilsystem.com/the-pomegranate-throughout-history

Madonna of the Pomegranate, 1487, Sandro Botticelli. Image Credit: http://www.arilsystem.com/the-pomegranate-throughout-history

 A walk through history, uncovers the significance of the pomegranate across diverse cultures and religions. Ancestors were aware of the health benefits and the juicy fruit is depicted on several paintings and historic writings.

In Christianity, the fruit is symbolic of Christ’s resurrection and defines immortality. Baby Jesus holding a pomegranate is a common sight and is seen depicted in both paintings and devotional statues. In medieval legends, the pomegranate tree is a symbol of fertility and a vital aspect in the hunt of the magical creature, the unicorn. Tapestries from the period depict images of wounded unicorn’s bleeding pomegranate arils.

Pomegranate flowers and fruits in an Ottoman Kaftan. Image Credit: http://www.arastan.com/journey/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/PomegrKaftan.jpg


Pomegranate flowers and fruits in an Ottoman Kaftan. Image Credit: http://www.arastan.com/journey/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/PomegrKaftan.jpg

The pomegranate is also a significant fruit in Judaism. The seeds are meant to signify sanctity, fertility and abundance. The fruit is one of the seven sacred fruits mentioned in the Holy Bible. Illustrations of this popular fruit are also seen in Judaic architecture and couture design for the Jewish kings and priests.  In China and Japan, the fruit invokes fertility and prosperity.

Based on early excavations of the Bronze Age, it is studied that the pomegranate was the first ever fruit to be excavated. The fruit is believed to be native to Iran and the Himalayan region of Northern India and then later cultivated across Asia, Africa and Europe.

A pomegranate in a Roman mosaic from the 4th century AD. Image Credit: http://art-history-images.com/photo/7569

A pomegranate in a Roman mosaic from the 4th century AD. Image Credit: http://art-history-images.com/photo/7569

An icon of the Silk Route, the rich color and elegance of the fruit has influenced the cultural and artistic imaginations of several in the Far East and India.

For more information, click here.

The Art World Mourns Over the Loss of a Great Indian Artist: Badri Narayan

Elisabetta Marabotto of Saffronart shares a note on the loss of a great artist: Badri Narayan

Badri Narayan, Kukkuta Jataka, 1987

Badri Narayan, Kukkuta Jataka, 1987. Image Credit: http://www.saffronart.com/auctions/PostWork.aspx?l=8506

“Narration comes to me naturally, I have been fond of telling stories since my childhood.”

London: In the early hours of Monday morning, Badri Narayan passed away in a hospital in Bangalore at the age of 84.

Narayan had a successful career not only as an artist and illustrator but also as an art teacher.

The artist is mostly known for his narrative and symbolic paintings. He drew heavily from Indian mythology and metaphors and acknowledged the influence of the Indian miniature tradition in his works. The artist believed in the two-dimensionality of painting, and preferred to work in a smaller format; one that he found practical and well suited for the watercolours that have been his preferred medium for several years. Narayan had also worked with etchings, woodcuts and ceramics and illustrated some children’s books.

Narayan exhibited his works for the first time at the Hyderabad Art Society in 1954 and since then he had more than 50 solo shows.

His creativity will definitely be missed.

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