Prabhakar Kolte’s Language of Colors

In conjunction with the current exhibition Prabhakar Kolte: “Deconstruction” at Gallery 7 in  Mumbai, Shradha Ramesh explores the artist’s visual language

New York: “It is what it is” is how Prabhakar Kolte (b. 1946) describes his art. A former student and teacher of Sir J.J School of Art, Mumbai, he has inspired and groomed many students with his modernist thinking. An abstract artist, he focuses on creation more than the commercial aspect of art.

Prabhakar Kolte, Untitled

Prabhakar Kolte, Untitled. Image Credit: http://gallery7.com/pdf/prabhakar_kolte_deconstruction.pdf

With paint dripping and blotches of colour dominating the canvas, Prabhakar Kolte creates a new visual language. His works are free from the mundane routines of life and embrace childlike playfulness through colour. For Kolte, art is a spiritual journey of creation, it is the interplay of colour and material infinity that drives his painting. Colour is seen in it’s joyous presence indemnifying the regular and formal thinking of seeing forms. Nature, the protagonist of his oeuvre, reflects the Swiss artist and teacher Paul Klee’s influence. Kolte notes, quoting his role model’s mantra: “Think of forming not forms.”

Prabhakar Kolte, Untitled

Prabhakar Kolte, Untitled. Image Credit: http://gallery7.com/pdf/prabhakar_kolte_deconstruction.pdf

Kolte explains the implied and gradual process of his creation, saying “Behind each painting lies six-seven paintings, hidden. I go on until satisfied. I do not think in terms of words, I start thinking in terms of color and form. The subject is the process itself. I have realised that nature is so vast and infinite, and outside I cannot reach this nature, but at least inside me I have access.”

Prabhakar Kolte, Untitled

Prabhakar Kolte, Untitled. Image Credit: http://gallery7.com/pdf/prabhakar_kolte_deconstruction.pdf

A forthright and expressive artist, his artworks are visual diaspora of his subjective view towards society and life. With philosophical and multidimensional perception to his artwork, Prabhakar Kolte believes that a painting is matter of seeing nature and not imitating, he doesn’t see nature as is but as colour forms. One seems to dwell deeper with each layer of colour on the canvas only to encounter occasional space of underlying pattern of colours being unearthed.

Prabhakar Kolte, Untitled

Prabhakar Kolte, Untitled. Image Credit: http://gallery7.com/pdf/prabhakar_kolte_deconstruction.pdf

Prabhakar Kolte says “The space I want to create is just not a dimension… it is very subtle experience of mind that is space for me,” his paintings are transformative creation of object, the translation of sensation from an existing object to abstract colour field on his canvas.  A story is interwoven with color and spatial interjection that traverses through his canvas as a geometric shapes or fossil like imprint or windows left ajar. He reinvented himself at varied stages, once under the guidance of his professor S.B. Palsikar and later on under the influence of his students at Sir J.J School, his canvases and installations mirror these experiences and learning processes.

Prabhakar Kolte, Untitled

Prabhakar Kolte, Untitled. Image Credit: http://gallery7.com/pdf/prabhakar_kolte_deconstruction.pdf

This exhibition will be on view until September 30 at Gallery 7 in Mumbai. For more information click here.

Sculptures in the Spotlight

Our upcoming Evening Sale on 12 September 2019 in New Delhi features unique and dynamic sculptures by leading Indian modernists K G Subramanyan, Sankho Chaudhuri, B Prabha, Himmat Shah, Gulam Mohammed Sheikh, Prodosh Das Gupta, Ramkinkar Baij, Jyoti Bhatt and Pilloo Pochkhanawala.

Read more ›

She Came, She Painted, She Conquered

A look at five women artists who redefined womanhood as a subject of enquiry.

Read more ›

Drawing from Literature and Legend: 4 Inspired Paintings

Four works from Saffronart’s upcoming Evening Sale in New Delhi on 20 September which draw upon themes and characters from folk tales, mythology and history.

Read more ›

How to ( … ) things that Don’t Exist

FIFA’s over but there’s more to Brazil than football! Sneha Shah explores the development of the 31st São Paolo Biennial.

Panning a little to the west of Rio de Janeiro, where Germany championed triumphantly at the FIFA 2014 World Cup Finals, the 31st São Paulo Biennale is shaping up for its early September vernissage. Whilst the home team had a terrible defeat, all my fellow Brazilian supporters will be happy to know that Brazil is appearing pretty strong on the art and culture front. For those new to it, the São Paulo Biennale is South America’s largest contemporary art survey, and the second oldest biennial in the world (1951) after Venice’s (1851). Promoting international involvement right from its initiation the Biennale has been instrumental in making Brazil an international centre for contemporary art and establishing a market for Brazilian art globally.

Image of the pavilion taken at the 30th Edition of the São Paulo Biennale (2012) Credit: Artinfo

Image of the pavilion taken at the 30th Edition of the São Paulo Biennale (2012)
Source: Artinfo

Like its Venetian counterpart, the São Paulo Biennale Foundation invites a team of curators to conceptualize the event. Charles Esche, Galit Eilat, Nuria Enguita Mayo, Pablo Lafuente and Oren Sagiv, along with associate curators Benjamin Seroussi and Luiza Proença, will be developing this year’s edition. Focusing on educative collaboration, questioning the definition of ‘art’ today, and eliminating formal hierarchies between artist, participant, viewer and user, the curators have decided to replace  genre-specific ‘artworks’ with the more generic term ‘projects’.

Inviting educators, sociologists, architects along with artists and performers to participate, the projects will be unresolved and exploratory; their unscrambling will sustain from the experiences and active involvement of individuals within the event. The curators urge “This is not a Bienal built on art and objects, but on people working with people on projects; on collaborations between individuals and groups; on relationships that should continue and develop throughout and, perhaps, even after the 31st Bienal is over,” on the official biennial website.

Official poster design by  participating artist Prabhakar Pachpute Credits: The Biennial

Official poster design by participating artist Prabhakar Pachpute
Source: The Biennial

Themed “How to (…) things that don’t exist”, with the ellipses interchangeable with verbs “feel”, “talk about”, “struggle with”, “use”, “read”, etc. the projects will reflect on subjects that seem to fall out of commonly accepted beliefs, frames of thinking and doing. Influenced or censored by expectations of immediate society, country, or world at large, human concerns, acts and understanding often materialize as emotions, injustices and struggles we feel we can’t surpass. The participating artists began their journey by ‘talking about’ these distresses, later moving onto ‘living with’ them as part of a 2-8 week residency within São Paolo and Brazil at large. ‘Using’, ‘struggling against’ and ‘learning from’ their experiences, the 75 collaborators will echo the optimism and possibilities of art today, challenging the capacity of the arts in its ability to reflect and act upon these ideals, beliefs, and societal concerns at the 31st São Paulo Biennial.

The biennial will open its doors on September 6th in the Ciccillo Matarazzo Pavilion. This year the pavilion has been divided in three architectural zones: the Park, Ramp and Columns, providing three distinctly different environments for viewers to encounter this artistic development and discourse.

The Park Credits: 31ABienal

The Park
Source: 31ABienal

The Ramp Credits: 31ABienal

The Ramp
Source: 31ABienal

The Columns Credits: 31ABienal

The Columns
Source: 31ABienal

That said, the participants have their work cut out for them and I for one cannot wait to see their creations! So don’t stray away from Brazil just yet, and stay tuned for more updates on the 31st São Paulo Biennial

%d bloggers like this: